True Quality CleaningStraight talk about caring for fine garments & household textiles from an expert who calls it like it is. In plain English.

The notion of airing out your drycleaned garments and household textiles is absurd

Clothesline on buildingYou've heard the "advice" before: air out your drycleaned garments and household textiles before bringing them into your home.

Here are two examples...

Example #1

 "It is always a good idea to air out dry cleaned garments in your garage or a spare room so the left over gases can escape. Take them out of the dry cleaning bag and let them air out for 24 hours, before hanging in the closet."

Example #2

 "If you do get your clothes dry cleaned, keep in mind that they can release perc into your home. While the levels are highest in the room in which the clothes are stored, perc will spread throughout your home for as long as a week. So, you might want to hang your clothes in the garage or outside before bringing them in."

Ridiculous!

The solution, of course, is not to worry about having to air out your dry cleaned garments. The solution is to find a skilled drycleaner who can produce a dry cleaned garment or household textile that's 100% odor free in the first place.

Let me explain.

Garments and household textiles should always be cleaned in drycleaning fluid that's both continuously purified and continuously filtered. Every single drop. This way your garments and household textiles are cleaned in drycleaning solvent or fluid that's absolutely crystal clear. As clear as bottled mountain spring water.

Continuous purification is much like boiling your tap water at home to obtain pure water; continuous filtration is much like filtering your tap water to remove any additional impurities.

Fact is, crystal clear, freshly purified and filtered drycleaning solvent or fluid is your only guarantee against greyish and dingy whites, creams and pastels; dull and faded colors; and that all-to-familiar "drycleaning solvent smell."

It's the difference between a black and white TV with mono sound and a high definition screen with surround sound.

Unfortunately, very few ordinary cleaners both continuously purify every single drop of their drycleaning solvent or fluid before and after each load, and continuously filter every single drop of their drycleaning solvent or fluid during each load.

So soluble impurities, such as bacteria, residual dyes, body oils, oily- type creams and lotions, and food fats accumulate in the drycleaning solvent or fluid: And insoluble impurities, such as sand, skin flakes and hair, float around in the drycleaning solvent or fluid.

These soluble impurities are then absorbed by the fibers of your garments and household textiles during the drycleaning "wash" cycle. In particular, natural fibers, such as silk, wool, linen and cotton, absorb these impurities like a sponge absorbs liquid.

Instead of your cleaner continuously purifying and continuously filtering his drycleaning solvent or fluid, your garments and household textiles are functioning as your cleaner's "cleaning filter."

In effect, your garments and household textiles are being cleaned in "dirty drycleaning solvent or fluid." It's just like washing your clothes at home and reusing the same dirty water over and over again.

So, what you're smelling is probably not drycleaning solvent or fluid. It's the accumulated contaminants in your garments and household textiles that you're smelling -- contaminants absorbed from your cleaner's "dirty drycleaning solvent or fluid."

Cringe at your leisure.

How can I help you?


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