True Quality CleaningStraight talk about caring for fine garments & household textiles from an expert who calls it like it is. In plain English.

Misrepresentations, distortions and outright lies (part one)

WhispererEvery cleaner claims to be a true quality drycleaner. Fact is, very few are.

But that doesn't stop them from claiming that they are. So they're forced to misrepresent, distort and even lie about the quality of the product they produce in general, and the processes and craftsmanship they employ to produce that product in particular.

Let's be specific ...

Drycleaning

Their verbal assurances, their promotional materials and their public relations professionals tell you that they gently dryclean and hand iron ALL your fine garments (other than shirt laundry). AS A MATTER OF ROUTINE.

Baloney! Bet they don't.

Truth is, you're paying $25 to $35 for a $10 to $15 suit that's been tossed into a drycleaning machine and machine pressed. And then "strategically touched up" by hand. If deemed necessary. If you're lucky.

It's "drycleaning" at it's most basic: garments that have been sorted into "lights" and "darks", tossed into a dryclean machine with little or no pre-spotting, and cleaned in a relatively aggressive, dye-stripping, toxic solvent ( perchloroethylene or synthetic petroleum) that's supplemented with moisture/water, fragrance and sizing. All this before your garments are machined pressed and then "squirted" with steam from a hand iron in an attempt to conceal any evidence of machine pressing.


What's more, many of your cottons and linens may not have been drycleaned at all. They've probably been washed or wetcleaned, tossed into a dryer, machine pressed, and then "squirted" with steam.

Shirt Laundry

Their verbal assurances, their promotional materials and their public relations professionals tell you that they gently clean and hand iron ALL your laundered shirts. AS A MATTER OF ROUTINE.

Hogwash! Bet they don't.

Truth is, you're paying $6 to $14 for a $1 to $2 shirt that has been boiled, bleached, baked and machine pressed. And then "strategically touched up" by hand. If deemed necessary. If you're lucky.

Many cleaners call this machine pressed/touched up shirt a "hand-finished shirt," hoping that you'll never understand the difference between a "hand ironed shirt" ($6 to $14) and a "machine pressed/touched up shirt" or "hand finished shirt" ($1 to $2).

Fine Bed and Table Linens

Their verbal assurances, their promotional materials and their public relations professionals tell you that they gently clean and perfectly finish ALL your fine bed and table linens. AS A MATTER OF ROUTINE. And that they do all their work in-house.

Poppycock! Bet they don't.

Truth is, you're way over paying for linens that are subcontracted to some cheap, unknown wholesale laundry. Where they're boiled and bleached before being run through a flatwork ironer (aka a Mangle ironer) like bathroom tissue through a Charmin factory. And yes, it's pronounced "mangler".

Summary

So there you have it. The truth about cleaners who present themselves as true quality cleaners but whose product - minus the fancy packaging - is, for the most part, no better than any above average ordinary cleaner.

So where does the truth lie? With the actual performance or with the promotional claim?

I'd suggest it's with the latter. So, what can you do to protect yourself against claims of actual performance that cannot be supported by the facts?

Carefully investigate all claims made by cleaners. Ask probing questions and insist on clear, jargon-free answers.

How can I help you?


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