True Quality CleaningStraight talk about caring for fine garments & household textiles from an expert who calls it like it is. In plain English.

Those spots and stains weren't on my garment before dry cleaning!

Apple, greenYou don't remember seeing a stain before you took that garment to the cleaner. Or before you put it away for the season.

It couldn't have been there. You'd have surely seen it. Right?

The more likely scenario is that the stain was not visible when you took it to the cleaner, or when you put it away for the season.

The transformation from an invisible to a visible stain is best explained by the common apple. When an apple is cut in half, the oxygen in the air causes the sugars in the apple to caramelize and turn brown.

Similarly, many stains are colorless when they first come into contact with your garment or household textile. After a period of time, they combine with oxygen in the air and/or heat, and transform from an invisible to a visible stain.

So just because you couldn't see a stain doesn't mean it wasn't lurking in the fibers of your garment or household textile.

You see, any time there is a stain, residue from the liquid that caused the stain is left on the garment or household textile. In fact, no matter how well you blot up the liquid (never wipe, scrub or rub!), something will always be left behind. It's the residue from the liquid that causes invisible stains.

And when the garment or household textile is dry cleaned and finished, the heat generated by the process can act as a catalyst to highlight the stain. Or when a garment or household textile is stored in a closet for a period of time, the oxygen from the air can act as a catalyst to highlight the stain.

When a stain suddenly appears, it means that the stain has oxidized. Heat, oxygen and time can oxidize and set the stain. A skilled stain removal technician can often remove the stain -- provided it has not completely oxidized or "set".

Some common liquids that can transform from an invisible to a visible stain include:

  • Oil stains such as linseed, peanut, coconut, soy bean and salad oils.
  • Tannin stains such as liquor, tea, soft drinks and medicines.
  • Albumin stains such as egg, milk, perspiration, blood and urine.

My best advice?

If you think you've stained a garment or household textile, inform your cleaner. This way the stain can be located and treated (provided, of course, that the cleaner has a skilled stain removal technician on premises). It's the best way to prevent a hidden problem from popping out into the open.

How can I help you?


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